Category Archives: Casey’s Adventures

Reflections

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Wow – I don’t know where to begin.  I have had technical challenges, editing challenges (I am way too wordy A LOT of the time), and concerns about meeting the ‘deliverables’ for the assignment.  Did I hit all the marks in the rubric?  Did i even know what a rubric really was when I started?

Mostly I worried about the mechanics at first – I was definitely a technology visitor for this project.  I lost my first posting!  Hilarious on some level, freaked me out on another.  I changed formats after a couple weeks from a perfectly serviceable background with books which i thoroughly liked to this wild, colorful option because of my mechanical challenges.  I couldn’t seem to get rid of some of the background irritants so I ended up switching to a format that was more Rusty-friendly.

Then I started creating drafts/posts and saving them ahead of time because I was busy elsewhere and wanted to be sure my postings went out regularly.  I didn’t check back for a while and found I had set the wrong dates so (of course) they weren’t posted, resulting in a few ‘back to back’ posts instead of a more thought-out post-as-you-go approach.

I still have some technical issues I haven’t resolved and no, I’m not going to tell you.  I’ll let you all figure it out!

Janet Cate at KFL is a marvel.  I emailed her in September, sat with her for an hour  or more that same month and then had another email exchange for clarity.  I didn’t check back with her for more details; I decided to visit the library and ask a few questions of other staff members while I took photos.  Everyone was more than helpful and eager to share their expertise.

Did I tick off all the bullets in the instructions including hIghlights, exemplary, unique service, more reflections?

HIGHLIGHTS (not previously mentioned):

There is a Maine Children’s Book Illustration gallery in the downstairs hall at KFL outside the children’s room.  I will attach a couple photos that don’t do it justice.  While not strictly a technology piece, it shows the beauty that goes into reading material for young people and deserves special mention.

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Wade Zaharis, pastel

Rising Liberty: The Story of the Statue of Liberty by Pegi Dietz Shea

UNIQUE SERVICE:  

GENEALOGY: many libraries now offer genealogical resources, KFL is designated as a Family Research Center by FamilySearch.org. They hold monthly genealogy educational and research meetings that are well attended.  The KFL website has a genealogical resource page with additional links.

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October Meeting: tips on genealogical blogs and podcasts

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Maine genealogical reference guides

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http://kennebunklibrary.org/kennebunk/genealogy.asp

genealogy poster 2014-2015

(please click all images to enlarge)

EXEMPLARY:

A staff that first caught the technology bug in the 1990s and didn’t let it get the better of them. Twenty years of researching new technologies, new lingo (interactive website, OPAC, e-books, twitter feed!), and staying current in a true technological revolution has led this group to an impressive skill set on which all patrons have come to rely as they use the modern resources at the Kennebunk Free Library.  Leadership, education, sharing their skills, keeping the community aware of their new automated systems, partnering with local museums and libraries to benefit their ‘customers’ – it has been a pleasure for me to learn how adept and skilled each and every library worker has become.

FINAL REFLECTIONS:

Special thanks to Janet Cate at KFL & everyone else on staff for letting me ask repetitious questions and for demonstrating Overdrive and the DaVinci magnifier and just generally letting me snap a lot of photos of my friend, retired children’s librarian, Lynda Bryan.  Huge appreciation to Sue Perkins at Cape Porpoise Library for taking me on as her Tuesday afternoon volunteer, and thanks a million to my mom, the Reverend Pat Adams (retired!) for loaning me her golden girl, Casey, to perk up this school project.  I learned so much, loved the challenge and now have a new skill that otherwise I would never have thought to pursue.

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                                            Lynda Bryan checking her email at KFL                finally getting to relax, Casey & Mom

   IMG_1560   Sue Perkins, Director, Cape Porpoise Library

A rugged, mobile wifi device brings the web to schools in Africa and beyond

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A rugged, mobile wifi device brings the web to schools in Africa and beyond

Technology and education in Africa – simple and elegant are the keywords –

TED Blog

Now that BRCK has launched, Ushahidi is turning its attention to where it will be best put to use -- in schools. Photo: BRCK Now that BRCK has launched, Ushahidi is turning its attention to where it will be best put to use — in schools. Photo: BRCK

BRCK is best described as a “backup generator for the internet.” When it was announced, the idea of a rugged, rechargeable, mobile wifi device captured imaginations as a good way to bring robust connectivity to people in places with spotty infrastructure – particularly in developing countries.

The device is the brainchild of Nairobi-based technology company Ushahidi, and was created partly out of simple frustration with dropped internet connections and power outages in the city. After a successful Kickstarter campaign last year, BRCK has now manufactured and shipped more than 1,000 units to 45 countries, many of them in emerging markets, and is catching up on the backlog of orders. So — what next?

Here, Juliana Rotich — a TED Fellow and founding member of Ushahidi — tells the TED Blog that BRCK is…

View original post 1,001 more words

Cape Porpoise Library: Changing Times?

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  Atlantic Hall houses the Cape Porpoise Library

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                Sue Perkins, Director

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                                                                       There is always a jigsaw puzzle to enjoy….

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                                Tony & Nancy Viehmann & Casey               Book Drop cost over $20,000, second-hand!

Cape Porpoise Library ( http://www.atlantichall.org/Atlantic_Hall/Library.html )- one welcoming room open 12 hours/week (that’s a WEEK, not a day!), online access & wifi, fax & copier, material still checked out by hand, pet friendly and a 3-minute walk from my door.  The perfect place to volunteer Tuesday afternoons!  Perhaps technology is in the eye of the beholder – up until now, the library director, Sue Perkins (16 years and counting) and the board of directors have felt that their approach has worked just fine for the local population; their patrons agree.  Now they are being ‘encouraged’ by the Maine State Library to jump on the automation band wagon if they want to keep their free internet access.

The patrons are 95% adult with only a very few child consumers; Graves Library in nearby Kennebunkport has a very active children’s program. It’s one of the challenges the library faces as they automate – there is a lot of weeding going on in Adult and Children’s books.  What is the appropriate amount to keep?  What percentage might be better as e-books or audio in the future? What is the time cut-off for disposing of material that is rarely checked out: 5 years? 10 years?

Until October, patrons signed out materials by name, now we have a 3 digit number assigned to us.  The book drop was until recently, an old post office mail box, but too many wet books and materials dropping to the base were damaged, so they invested in an update.

I see changes in the next couple years; I guess the trick is to update and not lose the small town charm.

(please click on photos to enlarge, then click on back arrow to return to blog posting)

KFL welcomes the Portland Bookmobile!

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It was a drizzly morning when the Portland Bookmobile pulled into the parking lot at the Kennebunk Free Library this past Thursday.  Since April 2013, this wonder-van has served as the focal point of Portland Public Library (PPL)’s portable library venture.  This month they are visiting nearby town libraries to show off their wares and sign up new patrons.

For Rusty, it was a chance to see a modern version of one of her childhood loves; for Casey it fell under ‘anything with wheels is heaven’.  The bookmobile stocks approximately 1,700 items of fiction and nonfiction, audiobooks, graphic novels, picture and chapter books and DVDs.  It is wheelchair accessible, has wireless Internet and solar panels.  This traveling collection fulfills part of the outreach mission of the PPL by serving areas of the city without a nearby branch; their routes take them to 20+ locations, including schools, neighborhoods, specialized care centers and events such as this.  They are able to reach patrons and families who may have health challenges, transportation issues or simply no time to make the trip downtown.

The 34-foot van cost approximately $166,000 and was paid for by a combination of library funds, private investment and a $50,000 donation from Key Bank.  The route schedule is posted online ( link accessible at http://www.portlandlibrary.com/locations/portable-library/l); each visit is 45 minutes.

Steve Weigle, driver and dog lover (“bring her right in, we love dogs!”) is today’s driver of this latest version of the PPL bookmobile.  I asked if more adults than kids used this service.  His reply? No, it was 75% kids, 25% adults – now that’s a job I might love.  He tells me his wife teaches an Archiving class at UMA/ILS, in fact I hope to take her class this winter – small world (personal communication, Oct 16, 2014).

I’ve added my new library tab to my key chain (done right there via their wifi computer connection in 3 minutes) and was reminded yet again that technology is an extraordinary enhancement to the world of libraries.

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REFERENCES:

Bookmobile brings books, Internet to Portland neighborhoods. (Apr 2, 2013). Received from http://www.pressherald.com/2013/04/02/new-portland-book-mobile-has-wireless-servive-solar-power/

Portable Library. (2014). Received from http://www.portlandlibrary.com/locations/portable-library/

Out and about on a Sunday morning

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Did you all know that Sunday mornings are a GREAT time to go

on a library hunt if you’re a dog?

This is me at the UNE Jack Ketchum Library

today, Sunday, October 5th, 9 am.

That’s my new friend, Kristina Michaud, behind me

at the front desk.  She let me run free

(‘it’s ok, there’s no one here but me at this early hour”)

and check out the computer stations and clinic,

showed me her front desk set-up, and told me to say

this library is TECHed OUT.  Rusty & Kristina suggested that

the library might have been busier a decade ago at 9 am on a Sunday, before the library

and the University offered online library access to all students and wireless access.

Am loving this virtual library dog gig…

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almost forgot: Rusty says this link made her swoon, so I guess that means it’s worth a click….

http://www.buzzfeed.com/wordsbydan/28-quotes-about-libraries-on-photos-of-beautiful-l-b6bd